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07/07/2011

Alternative Energy Expert Frances Arnold Profiled in the LA Times

Katie Neith

For biochemist and chemical engineer Frances Arnold, the road to success has not been straight and narrow. In fact, she has often bucked the academic tradition of rigorous, time-consuming pre-experiment methodology for a more fast and furious approach to research. 

 

 

05/24/2011

Improving Health Assessments with a Single Cell

Katie Neith

There's a wealth of health information hiding in the human immune system. Accessing it, however, can be very challenging, as the many and complex roles that the immune system plays can mask the critical information that is relevant to addressing specific health issues. Now, research led by scientists from the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) has shown that a new generation of microchips developed by the team can quickly and inexpensively assess immune function.

03/29/2011

ACS Honors Zewail

On March 29, the world's largest scientific society will bestow its highest honor on Ahmed H. Zewail, Caltech's Linus Pauling Professor of Chemistry and professor of physics.

03/28/2011

President Obama's Science Advisor to Speak on "Science, Technology and Innovation Policy"

Kathy Svitil

Dr. John P. Holdren, assistant to the president for science and technology, director of the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy, and co-chair of the President's Council of Advisors on Science and Technology (PCAST), will be the speaker at the 2011 DuBridge Distinguished Lecture Series at the California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

03/27/2011

Nobel Laureate Ahmed Zewail to be Caltech Commencement Speaker

Kathy Svitil

Renowned chemist and Nobel laureate Ahmed Zewail, Linus Pauling Professor of Chemistry and professor of physics at the California Institute of Technology (Caltech), will be the speaker for Caltech's 117th annual commencement ceremony, which will take place at 10 a.m. on June 10 of this year.

01/04/2011

Arnold Wins Draper Prize

Kathy Svitil

Frances Arnold has been named co-recipient of the Charles Stark Draper Prize by the National Academy of Engineering. She was awarded the $500,000 prize—the engineering profession's highest honor—for a method called directed evolution, used worldwide to guide the creation of certain properties in proteins and cells, allowing the engineering of novel enzymes and biocatalytic processes for pharmaceutical and chemical products.

10/27/2010

Caltech/JPL Experiments Improve Accuracy of Ozone Predictions in Air-Quality Models

Lori Oliwenstein

A team of scientists led by researchers from Caltech and JPL have fully characterized a key chemical reaction that affects the formation of pollutants in smoggy air. The findings suggest that in the most polluted parts of Los Angeles—and on the most polluted days in those areas—current models are underestimating ozone levels, by between 5 to 10 percent.

09/29/2010

NIH Awards $11.5 Million for New Caltech-Led Membrane-Protein Center

Lori Oliwenstein

The National Institutes of Health has awarded $11.5 million to a consortium of research institutions led by the California Institute of Technology for the creation of a center for the study of membrane-protein structures.

09/22/2010

Caltech Researchers Design a New Nanomesh Material

Marcus Woo

Computers, light bulbs, and even people generate heat—energy that ends up being wasted. Thermoelectric devices, which convert heat to electricity and vice versa, harness that energy. But they're not efficient enough for widespread commercial use or are made from expensive or environmentally harmful rare materials.

Now, Caltech researchers have developed a new type of material—a nanomesh, composed of a thin film with a grid-like arrangement of tiny holes—that could lead to efficient thermoelectric devices.

09/02/2010

Caltech Chemists Develop Simple Technique to Visualize Atomic-Scale Structures

Kathy Svitil

Researchers at Caltech have devised a new technique—using a sheet of carbon just one atom thick—to visualize the structure of molecules. The technique, which was used to obtain the first direct images of how water coats surfaces at room temperature, can also be used to image a potentially unlimited number of other molecules, including antibodies and other biomolecules.